Richard Sherman pleads guilty to two misdemeanor charges from July arrest

Former Seattle Seahawks and San Francisco 49ers cornerback Richard Sherman, who was most recently with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers during the 2021 season, pleaded guilty Monday morning in Seattle to two misdemeanor charges stemming from his July arrest.

Sherman pleaded guilty in King County Superior Court to negligent driving in the first degree and criminal trespass in the second degree (non-domestic violence), as well as an infraction for speeding in a roadway construction zone.

He had been arrested July 14 after police said he drove his SUV into a closed construction zone, sustaining significant damage, and fled the scene of the accident. Sherman then attempted to break down the front door of his in-laws’ home, which was caught on the surveillance system of the Redmond, Washington, residence.

Sherman had been drinking heavily and spoke of killing himself, according to police reports. His wife, Ashley Sherman, called 911 to try to stop him before the crash along Highway 520.

Sherman pleaded guilty as part of an agreement that spares him further jail time. He was given a 90-day jail sentence with 88 days suspended and credit for two days already served. He was ordered to pay $825.50 in fees and penalties to the court clerk, and $500 for speeding in the construction zone. He also must pay restitution to his father-in-law, with the amount to be determined at a later date, and to the Department of Transportation. He will be under monitored supervision for two years.

Sherman initially faced other misdemeanor charges, including two domestic violence counts — second-degree criminal trespass and third-degree malicious mischief — as well as driving under the influence, reckless endangerment of roadway workers and resisting arrest.

Sherman signed with the Buccaneers in September on a one-year deal after the team experienced a rash of injuries at the cornerback position, but he was plagued by injuries himself, including to his hamstring and calf and an Achilles injury that ended his season. Still, he remained with the team, serving in a pseudo-coaching role with the Bucs’ defensive backs until they were knocked out of the playoffs in the divisional round. Teammates affectionately called him “Coach Sherm,” and the coaching staff praised his leadership.

“[The arrest] led to some really positive changes — some help, some therapies, some tools that I didn’t have before — to address some things that you kind of let stack up in your mind,” Sherman said in September. “You never have time to address them. It’s not the right moment. It’s not the right place in your life to deal with these emotions and feelings.”

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

Source link

Leave a Reply